Wednesday, January 13, 2010

2010 Great Backyard Bird Count: 12-15 February

The 2010 Great Backyard Bird Count (February 12 - 15th) is a great opportunity to connect people with nature, and further the Audubon mission.

- The Great Backyard Bird Count is a great way for people of all ages to connect with nature. Audubon and Cornell invite you to get involved February 12 - 15, 2010-- President's Day weekend.

- It's easy - just count the birds in your backyard, local park or another location and report what you see online at www.birdcount.org"Count for Fun, Count for the Future"

- Taking part in the GBBC helps give scientists important information about birds and the environment we share. When you volunteer to help you become part of a large team of Citizen Scientists across the country. You can see what birds are being reported in your own neighborhood and throughout the United States and Canada by visiting www.birdcount.org

- Bird-watching is the second fastest growing hobby in the USA, right after gardening. The Great Backyard Bird Count combines the two. Find out why people love to combine them. Discover how you can create a bird-friendly yard. http://www.audubonathome.org/birdstohelp/

- You can count anywhere you choose - at a local park, a school yard, even a city garden. Any one can join the fun; no experience required. It's FREE.

- The Great Backyard Bird Count is perfect as a family exercise. Bird watching is a stress-reducer. Listening to bird songs helps too!Introducing a relative or friend to bird watching is a wonderful gift. Set up a Binocular Boot Camp to urge newcomers to learn how to identify birds at your local Audubon Center or Chapter.

- Develop you own version of Birding Basics http://www.audubon.org/bird/at_home/bird_watching/index.shtml

2 comments:

CE Webster said...

Good luck with the count. It is a great family activity and it is really important to know about the bird population.

kwsuydam said...

I have a Red Breasted Sapsucker outside my house in a tree. It is making little marks all around a tree. I think that is rare to have a Red Breast Sapsucker in Kodiak, Alaska.